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What does PIC'(10)9V9T' mean?

 
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r2k1984

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PostPosted: Mon Dec 12, 2011 11:51 pm    Post subject: What does PIC'(10)9V9T' mean?
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Hi,

I have a field declaration for the one of the input file where it is having 11 digit number and a character at last for this field.

I have moved the value to another field with declaration as PIC '(10)9.9'

Is that correct?

For example value for the input field is "00000008692G" and i'm getting output as 869.2 .

Regards,
Ram
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Bill Woodger

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PostPosted: Tue Dec 13, 2011 12:02 am    Post subject: Reply to: What does PIC'(10)9V9T' mean?
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I guess it is the gold-old-sign. If you look at the value with HEX ON you'll see C8?

You are then chopping off your second decimal place when moving it to the other field. Whether or not that is what you want, I have no idea.
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Akatsukami

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PostPosted: Tue Dec 13, 2011 12:06 am    Post subject:
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The "T" is an overpunched zoned decimal digit (one of those things that doesn't get a lot of use these days). As Sr. Woodger says, it's an actual digit, so you're losing significance.
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dbzTHEdinosauer

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PostPosted: Tue Dec 13, 2011 12:43 am    Post subject:
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the real culprit is the picture clause
Code:

PIC '(10)9.9'


it is not signed and it should be......

as well as the PIC Clause (10)9... is invalid and will not compile.

actually you also need to define the source field with a sign,
something like S9(10)V9
and then move to an Z(09)9.9-
using a negative sign will only display those that are negative,
which makes it easier to read.
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dbzTHEdinosauer

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PostPosted: Tue Dec 13, 2011 1:11 am    Post subject:
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I stand corrected, thx Robert,
it will compile in COBOL and probably PL1.

my fault for the postings, wrong forum.
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Robert Sample

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PostPosted: Tue Dec 13, 2011 1:26 am    Post subject:
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On the other hand, (10)9V99 is a three byte variable compared to 9(10)V99.
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dbzTHEdinosauer

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PostPosted: Tue Dec 13, 2011 1:30 am    Post subject:
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ok, i'll bite:
why is (10)9V99 a three byte variable?
how does the compiler treat the (10) ?
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Akatsukami

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PostPosted: Tue Dec 13, 2011 1:49 am    Post subject:
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dbzTHEdinosauer wrote:
ok, i'll bite:
why is (10)9V99 a three byte variable?
how does the compiler treat the (10) ?

I believe this to be a misinterpretation of how PL/I handles the declaration (it may be different in COBOL). I wrote:
Code:
FOO:    PROC OPTIONS (MAIN) REORDER;
DCL I PIC '(10)9.9';                 
DCL P FIXED DEC (11,1) INIT (-123.4);
I = P;                               
END FOO;                             

In the automatic variable map it gives:
Code:
OFFSET (HEX)   LENGTH (HEX)   NAME     
                                       
         98             10    #MX_TEMP1
         A8              6    P       
         B0              C    I       
         BC              D    _temp1   

I occupies 12 bytes, as expected. Using a V instead of a period would give 11 bytes, since the decimal point is only assumed (PL/I period in a picture has alignment power, IIRC).
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r2k1984

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PostPosted: Tue Dec 13, 2011 4:45 am    Post subject:
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Thanks for your inputs.

So final outcome of this discussion is the field has to be defined as S9(10)V99?
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Bill Woodger

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PostPosted: Tue Dec 13, 2011 5:18 am    Post subject: Reply to: What does PIC'(10)9V9T' mean?
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What you gave in the subject for this topic seems valid PL/I for describing your data field on you file. In Cobol, the equvaltent would be S9(10)V99. I don't know if there is a different way to define it in PL/I.

What you do with it then, depends on you. It is a signed numeric field with 10 digits in front of an implied decimal place, and two digits after the implied decimal place. The "letter" is how a positive 8 is represented in either of those fields (the PL/I or the Cobol).

If you "move" the field to something that has only one decimal place, you will "loose significance" as has been said.
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Bill Woodger

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PostPosted: Tue Dec 13, 2011 5:36 am    Post subject:
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dbzTHEdinosauer wrote:
ok, i'll bite:
why is (10)9V99 a three byte variable?
how does the compiler treat the (10) ?


Looks like you were kinda right the first time.

Language Reference wrote:

An unsigned nonzero integer enclosed in parentheses immediately following any of these symbols specifies the number of consecutive occurrences of that symbol.


The symbols are the usual suspects for the PIC clause. None in front of the "(10)". Seems to be "valid" but does not actually do anything.

Of course. A bug which doesn't cause anything to go wrong. It'll be an "Undocumented IBM Extension".
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Bill Woodger

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PostPosted: Tue Dec 13, 2011 6:11 am    Post subject: Reply to: What does PIC'(10)9V9T' mean?
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It seems that this bag-o-rubbish

Code:
01  WEIRD-MAN-WEIRD PIC (1)(2)(50)(2)999.


quite happily compiles without even a hint of a scrinch of any sort of problem. Gives you a three-byte numeric, which behaves like a three-byte numeric.

EDIT: Not limited to numerics, everything seems to not go to pot. It would seem that to get this to not compile you'd have to exceed 50 characters in the PICTURE string.

Definitely an Undocumented IBM Extension. I don't know if it is a Recorded Undocumented IBM Extension, I can't locate it with google but haven't tried IBM :-)
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Bill Woodger

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PostPosted: Tue Dec 13, 2011 6:41 am    Post subject: Reply to: What does PIC'(10)9V9T' mean?
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I'm sure this used to give a "warning" in VS-COBOL.

Code:
PIC 9(6).99.

PIC (6)Z.99.


I received a spec for a program over the 'phone from my boss, the report was needed the following day. He said the results of testing looked good, it was a pity that one field wasn't edited, but that could wait.

I thought I'd "fix" the field before I went home, and wacked it into production (different days, no "cycle"). I knew I got a warning in the compile, but they don't matter, do they?

Damn thing said "PICTURE CLAUSE INVALID UNLESS" and then something to do with a PIC for old UK pounds, shillings and pence currency (I'm glad I missed out on them). "PIC 9 ASSUMED" the message ended. Having driven 250 miles home, my boss had to come in and fix it having rung up the operators at 4am to check it was OK.

I found the compile listing on my desk in the morning with a huge red circile around the message... boss didn't turn up until 11am.

I always checked warnings after that.
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